Out of this World

NASA announced that September 2017 to September 2018 is A Year of Education on Station for the International Space Station (ISS), featuring a variety of education-related events for students and teachers. Astronaut Richard (Ricky) Arnold, a volunteer board member for the Project WET Foundation, will be the educator on board the ISS for the latter half of this year—from March to September 2018. Given Project WET’s connection with Ricky, the Project WET Foundation seized the opportunity to enhance educational activities relating to water and the ISS’s Year of Education on Station. For more information about these educational offerings see descriptions below.

Screencap of ISS Water Challenge Course

Water Use Challenge

 Lesson Plan

#AstroFriday

ISS Photos

About the Water Use Challenge

Screencap of ISS Water Challenge Course

To get you started on this journey with Ricky, Project WET designed The Water Use Challenge, a fun and interactive digital trivia challenge for ages eight and up. Do you know how much water you use in a day? How much water does Ricky use in space? The answers may surprise youtake the challenge and find out!

Take the Challenge

 

Total Gallons of Water Saved

People who have taken the Out of this World Water Use Challenge

have pledged to save 9,392.88 gallons of water since March 20, 2018.

Updated 10/4/18

 

About the Out of this World Lesson Plan

About the Lesson Plan

The Out of This World Lesson Plan is available as a free download on the Project WET store. It is a compilation of Project WET activities relevant to grades K-12 that can be used to teach about water and relate the lessons to the ISS. Each of these water-focused lessons offer a platform for learning about how this precious resource relates to and is seen from space.

Several of the activities listed in the lesson plan are available for immediate download on the Project WET Store. Other activities are found only in the Project WET Curriculum and Activity Guide 2.0, available to educators who have completed a workshop with a local Project WET partner. Contact your local Project WET Coordinator for information on workshops near you.

Download the Lesson Plan

 

Resources and Materials to be used with the Lesson Plan

 

About #AstroFriday

#AstroFriday started as a series of questions submitted by Project WET educators and answered by Astronaut Ricky Arnold about water in space and on Earth and how being an astronaut has shaped his views of water. Now you can also find all other blog posts relating to Ricky and the International Space Station in this space.

 

#AstroFriday

Ricky Arnold smiles and chats with support personnel as he begin's re-adapting to gravity after 197 days in space. Credit: NASA/ROSCOSMOS

Astronaut Ricky Arnold Among Crew Safely Returned to Earth After 197 Days in Space

Astronaut Ricky Arnold—who serves as a volunteer member of the Project WET Foundation Board of Directors—is one of the three International Space Station crew members who landed safely in Kazakhstan today.
Ricky participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) on a 2009 mission to the International Space Station (Photo by NASA)

#AstroFriday: Spot the Station

Editor’s note: NASA announced that September 2017 to September 2018 is A Year of Education on Station for the International Space Station (ISS), featuring a variety of education-related events for students and teachers.

Astronaut Sharon Christa McAuliffe, payload specialist Teacher in Space Project. Photo credit: NASA

#AstroFriday: Delivering Christa’s Legacy

In an Earth-to-space call with Astronaut Ricky Arnold, the Challenger Center and NASA this week announced the availability of the first of a planned series of video lessons based on curriculum developed by Christa McAuliffe.
Project WET Foundation Board of Directors member and water reuse expert Dr. Alan Rimer

#AstroFriday: Learning about Water Reuse on Earth from Astronauts in Space

Astronauts on board the International Space Station (ISS) can teach us a lot about water reuse. On ISS, astronauts like Ricky eat and drink many of the same foods we do, but their urine, humidity condensate and other system waters is then recycled in a specially built treatment unit.
The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, as photographed by Ricky Arnold on the International Space Station (image courtesy of NASA)

#AstroFriday: The Sacramento- San Joaquin Delta from Space

This is the first in a series of posts that will highlight photos taken by Astronaut Ricky Arnold from the International Space Station (ISS). The photos are part of an ISS program that began in 1961, Crew Earth Observations (CEO). As NASA’s website explains, “Crew members on the International Space Station (ISS) photograph the Earth using digital handheld cameras from their unique point of view located 200 miles above the surface.

Astronaut Ricky Arnold

#AstroFriday: A Teacher Appreciation Week Message from the ISS

Educator-turned-astronaut Ricky Arnold is currently on the International Space Station, orbiting the Earth at 17,500 mph! This #TeacherOnBoard the ISS has a special #ThankATeacher message for all the educators out there!

Cindy Etgen and her husband, Lou, in front of the Soyuz

Guest Post: Up Close and Personal with the Launch to the ISS

Project WET Maryland Coordinator Cindy Etgen had a front-row seat, literally, to Astronaut Ricky Arnold’s liftoff to the International Space Station.

Celebrating an Out of this World Water Day

World Water Day is March 22nd, and Ricky Arnold is scheduled to lift off to the International Space Station (ISS) on March 21st. We're also launching our newest children's activity booklet, Water, Agriculture & Food.
AstroFriday Week 8 Answer

#AstroFriday: A Teacher in Space

The final #AstroFriday question highlights Ricky's perspective as a former classroom teacher embarking on the second half of NASA's Year of Education on Station.
AstroFriday Week 7 question small What solutions for water conservation and reuse that are used on the ISS could be applicable to addressing water problems on Earth?

#AstroFriday: Bringing ISS Lessons to Earth

Today's #AstroFriday question concerns how the technology and knowledge that astronauts use on the International Space Station could benefit people on Earth.
AstroFriday answer week six

#AstroFriday: To Mars and Beyond?

This week's #AstroFriday question looks ahead to Mars and beyond!
Answer by Astronaut Ricky Arnold

#AstroFriday: Is the Earth Losing Water to Space?

This week's #AstroFriday question, submitted by Chuck Dugan of Arizona Project WET, asks if the Earth is losing water to space.
Photo by NASA (Answer by Ricky Arnold)

#AstroFriday: How Does Being In Space Impact How You See Water on Earth?

This week's #AstroFriday question is about how Ricky's time in space has affected his views about water on Earth.
Photo courtesy of NASA

#AstroFriday: How Is Water Used Differently in Space?

The #AstroFriday question for this week is about how astronauts use water in space.
Question for Ricky Arnold, ISS Astronaut: Week 2

#AstroFriday: How Has Water Changed Over Time?

Today's #AstroFriday question is about observing changes in water over time from the vantage point of space.
Ricky participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) on a 2009 mission to the International Space Station (Photo by NASA)

#AstroFriday: Astronaut Ricky Arnold Tackles Your “Water in Space” Questions

This March, Astronaut Ricky Arnold will return to space, this time for a six-month stint on the International Space Station. A former science teacher, Ricky will be taking part in NASA’s Year of Education on Station initiative, sharing his love of STEM and passion for teaching.
The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, as photographed by Ricky Arnold on the International Space Station (image courtesy of NASA)

About ISS Photos

A series of blog posts will highlight certain photos that Ricky takes from the International Space Station (ISS). The photos are part of an ISS program that began in 1961, Crew Earth Observations (CEO). As NASA’s website explains, “Crew members on the International Space Station (ISS) photograph the Earth using digital handheld cameras from their unique point of view located 200 miles above the surface. Photographs record how the planet is changing over time, from human-caused changes like urban growth and reservoir construction, to natural dynamic events such as hurricanes, floods and volcanic eruptions.” Before Ricky’s launch to the ISS, we asked Project WET’s global network for nominations of places to be photographed. As the photographs are taken, these posts will highlight why the area was chosen, what water issues exist there and how educators can teach about these places.

The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta

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