#AstroFriday: Spot the Station

Editor’s note: NASA announced that September 2017 to September 2018 is A Year of Education on Station for the International Space Station (ISS), featuring a variety of education-related events for students and teachers. Astronaut Richard (Ricky) Arnold, a volunteer board member for the Project WET Foundation, is the educator on board currently. 

ISS is the third brightest object in the sky and easy to spot if you know when to look upISS is the third brightest object in the sky and easy to spot if you know when to look up (Photo courtesy of NASA) With Ricky's time in space nearing its end, you have a limited opportunity left to "see" him on ISS. Luckily, NASA's Spot The Station website makes it easy:

Watch the International Space Station pass overhead from several thousand worldwide locations. It is the third brightest object in the sky and easy to spot if you know when to look up. Visible to the naked eye, it looks like a fast-moving plane only much higher and traveling thousands of miles an hour faster! Several times a week, Mission Control at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, TX, determines sighting opportunities for over 6,700 locations worldwide. If your specific city or town isn’t listed, pick one that is fairly close to you. The space station is visible for a long distance around each of the listed locations.

You can find viewing points via the website's interactive map, or you can sign up to get a text or email alert when ISS is flying over your area. In addition to finding out how to spot ISS from Earth, you can also see images taken from ISS of Earth.  

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